Christie Film Still Hidden

July 12, 2013

All Posts, News

The Last American Outlaw, Nick Mead’s documentary film about former Hells Angel George Christie and his current legal woes, has still not been publically viewed.

The film was scheduled to be screened for potential buyers last month in a place called the Bell Arts Factory, a brief stroll from the old Angels clubhouse in Ventura. The screening was sold out and there was a waiting list.

Two years ago Christie was accused of “conspiring” to “interfere with commerce and the movement of articles and commodities in commerce;” extortion and conspiracy to commit arson. Christie was locked up for six weeks and was confined to his home until he pled guilty to two counts of conspiracy early this year.

No! No! Wait!

The Department of Justice seems scared of the film and told Christie last month that if the film was shown prosecutors would insure Christie would go to prison. So, the screening was cancelled. Christie will be sentenced August 15th.

Today Christie’s old club chimed in with their own concerns about the movie. Long time friend of the club Fritz Clapp issued an official club statement that read:

“Hells Angels MC generally disapproves of its members or former members exploiting their club affiliation for personal advantage, and has a process for them to obtain limited permission for use of its brand and marks in biographical depictions.

“Consequently, HAMC has demanded that the Mead/Christie film not be displayed, marketed or distributed until and unless all clearance issues are resolved.”

George Knows

Clapp declined to elaborate on what the club expects Christie to do but said, “George has been around long enough. He certainly knows what’s expected of him.”

Clapp also said, “I talked to Nick last December. It sounds like a good film. I hope we can work this out.”

Until Christie is finally sentenced and his differences with his former club are resolved, one way or another, you can still see a couple minutes from the beginning of the movie here. No Angels patch appears in the clip.



21 Responses to “Christie Film Still Hidden”

  1. I.J Says:

    Shame it hasn’t been aired as it looks like a good movie……..

  2. RLG Says:

    It would be a shame if this film was stolen, ripped to an .avi file and uploaded to The Pirate Bay:

    Strength, Honor, Love, Respect,


  3. FAST FREDDY Says:

    Hell Yeh

  4. Freeman Says:

    I haven’t seen the entire flick, but from the intro piece, that touches me a hell of alot more than any ”sons rising to anarchy riding the devil’s w______s” (out of respect for the true wn is why its underscored)

    Funny how even in the bikers world, realitywhore tv brings in the ratings, or for a website ”hits” no pointy stick at rebel, you bring in relevant news and all those shows are relevant to practically anyone visiting this site,and you do a damn good job.

    I may have put my foot in my mouth, i will know when i see it whole.

    But fuck, the whore eeeeeeeeeee flying reality shit? gimme a break.

    weed show,moonshine show, 1% shows,repo show? beating people up to repossess a car…on camera…thousands watching…no lawsuit… i am to believe that? moonshine, w-e-e-d growing, a_t-f is not watching?

    hell they probably produce those shows to keep a steady work load: this is how to do it, we have learned from the best, now you give it a try… GUYS we have new assignments!

  5. Va.Bob Says:

    Nobody can defend a brand the way Fritz Clapp can.And I remember perusing a certain charter’s website e-mails a few years back where it was explained to the general public thusly:”Ex-members have no status”.Doesn’t matter who you are.Yeah,I’d like to see the flick,too.But as Chris Rock would say:”I understand.”

  6. Mike Says:

    Seems to me that the film has less to do with the club and more to do with Mr. Christie’s life post-club. Hmm, just a thought, but could Mr. Clapp’s statement protesting this film be due to a marketing conflict involving a former “Brother” of Mr. Christie’s and his film rather than trademark infringement concerns? I would rather see Christie’s film, the Discovery channel has a lock on biker fiction right now anyway.

  7. Base Says:

    I would like to see this film.

    The fed’s do not want it released, it would shine a not so good light on how they operate and when they get someone in their sights how they will got to any lengths and means to “GIT EM”. Even if it means lies, manipulation of evidence and total disregard for a citizens rights.

    Now his former club having an issue with the film. Understandable. And hope both parties could come to an agreement.

    It’s the right thing to do.

    Head on a swivel.

    As always, respectively


  8. rollinnorth Says:

    Wow, a publicist’s dream: “The film the Federal Government did not want you to see!!!”
    Who would have thought George Christie, of all people, would fall into a flap with Fritz Clapp?
    A true documentary film gets, in effect, censored by the Feds while self-proclaimed “story tellers/documentary film makers” like Cameron Casey can get their drivel on cable TV.
    “Strange days indeed…”

    Time to go click some links, keep Rebel’s work going.


  9. bigdowner Says:

    Nowhere on the poster or in the trailer is the logo trademark displayed or the club mentioned. I believe it is mentioned in the documentary for historical context. Even Fritz and Sonny cannot revise or rewrite history.

    George Christie Jr. was a Hells Angel for 35 years and to not allude to that fact for political reasons would defeat the whole purpose of the documentary – the continual quest for truth.

    The H.A.M.C. promoting censorship, restraint of trade, and litigious corporate bullying in a quest for dominance over one man. If I didn’t know any better, I’d swear they have become everything they were rebelling against in the first place.

  10. Jenkx Says:


    IP (Intellectual Property) is the heart of any venture. (Remember how eager the Justice Dept was to get its hands on the Mongol patch.) Unless vigorously defended, names, images, products, etc. can become “genericized” and public domain. “Aspirin,” “phillips-head,” and “zipper” are just a few examples. Anybody can use the name or image.

    Jealously guarding the HAMC from becoming public domain is Fritz H. Clapp, Esq.’s passion.

    The only IP lawyers I fear more are the ones from Disney.

    Nick is a courageous and talented person. His writing and cinema work goes back to “Black Leather Jacket.”

    The BS from Justice is rank.


  11. stroker Says:

    Let’s not bash Fritz and the HAMC too fast here. I don’t presume to speak for the HAMC, but I do know Fritz, and I believe his statement is simply meant to forestall any problems for both the Red & White, and George Christie (especially with sentencing coming up for Mr. Christie).

  12. DesertH-D Says:

    Agree with Stroker. I think maybe some folks might not be seeing the forest, for all them trees in the way…

  13. Paladin Says:

    “The Department of Justice seems scared of the film and told Christie last month that if the film was shown prosecutors would insure Christie would go to prison. So, the screening was cancelled. Christie will be sentenced August 15th.”

    So, if the prosecutors are threatening Mr. Christie with prison time, if the Mead/Christie film is shown, what are they going to do to keep the film from being shown, after Mr. Christie’s sentencing? If the DOJ is truly scared of this film, then it wouldn’t suprise me if the burial of this film becomes part of Mr. Christie’s sentencing agreement.

    I can see the point of Mr. Christie’s former club. This film’s draw is due to the fact that Mr. Christie was the former President of the Ventura Charter of the HAMC.

    I don’t think there would much, if any interest in making a film titled: The Last American Restaurateur”, showcasing the life and times of the owner/operator of the Dennys resturant, in Ventura, Ca.

    Of coures, I could be, and am probably wrong about all of this. Lately, it’s been hot, humid, and I’m old. I’m sure this combination has kept me from arriving at any coherent conclusions.

    Long May You Ride (to those that deserve to),


  14. Phuquehed Says:

    Could he sell the movie for real cheap to someone who *can* then show it to the world?

  15. 10Guage Says:


    It is gold, and right in the middle of the windscreen on his fairing…and prominent through the entire trailer.


  16. Paladin Says:


    Mr. Mead, Mr. Christie, or anyone that owned and attempted to show this film, without first entering into an agreement with the owner of copyrighted material found within the film, would have copyright infringement problems.

    Long May You Ride (to those that deserve to),


  17. bigdowner Says:

    Hell (can I say that?), I’d hate to think what would have happened if George decided to market his own brand of chili…

    This legal stuff is intimidating. I miss the old days when disputes could be resolved by us beating the living daylights out of each other in the alleys behind our favorite watering holes.



  18. Paladin Says:


    Mr. Christie would be able to market his own brand of chili. He just couldn’t label it as: George Christie’s, Hells Angeles Chili. Nor could he use that club’s legally protected logo (the helmeted Death Head), without the club’s written permission.

    Long May You Ride (to those that deserve to),


  19. Bill Says:

    A couple critiques: I think the title is a bit presumptuous, and my hunch is it may be marketing ploy on someone’s part other than Mr. Christie. Also, it may bug certain people just enough to give them even more reason to impede the showing of this film. Of course, I could be way off on this, and maybe nobody at all cares, but it seems that if the film’s presentation is being resisted by an outlaw MC, for whatever the stated reasons, then the title being “The Last American Outlaw” would seem in itself some sort of additional red flag. Also, the “homage to Easy Rider” bit is I think the wrong way to present this. If anything, it’s the reverse that’s basically true, though that movie came out 44 years ago. Fonda and Hopper were attempting to portray a slice of the life that Mr. Christie actually came along and lived himself a short time later. The “life” was already established, and Mr. Christie was truly a part of it, and regardless of the relative timing of the movie versus his part in that life, I’m pretty sure he wasn’t copying the characters in Easy Rider, and that’s why I’m saying his film needn’t take a back seat via any “homage” to that movie.
    I intend no disrespect toward anyone with these observations, they are just my honest opinions on this artistic effort.

  20. bigdowner Says:


    I kind of figured that too – it was my attempt at sarcasm – perhaps if I hadn’t left out one primary component – in this case “wit” – it would have worked.

    You know, there was a time I would call my “biker” friends looking to score the best crank.

    Now I call my biker friends looking to score the cheapest Glyburide, Glucophage or Lisinopril.

    I don’t want to live.

  21. Tim Ferguson Says:

    Oh boy more publicly just what law enforcement needs. For those members that can write I say go write a book become publicly hounds like the leadership. Give enforcement all the help you can maybe they’ll make an honorary leo.

    When will ALL leadership STFU
    Rank and file members pay for this shit

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